Home

  • The Polish Perspective of American Foreign Policy: Selected Moments from the Cold War Era

    March 22, 2017

    Introduction Bipolarity in international relations was the main characteristic of the Cold War Era. The world was divided between two opposing political, economic and military blocs. The Soviet Union installed communist regimes in most of the European countries during the Second World War in Central and Eastern…

    Read More

  • Soviet Perspective On The Cold War And American Foreign Policy

    March 20, 2017

    Ukraine gained its independence in 1991, when the Soviet Union was dissolved and former Soviet republics became sovereign states. Since that time Ukraine started its own policy, with the Ukrainian point of view on history, international relations, and politics differing greatly from the Russian perspective. But during…

    Read More

  • Conference on Israel and Cosmological Empires: May 15-16, 2017

    March 19, 2017

    The University of Munich and the Catholic University of Milan is hosting a conference on Israel and Cosmological Empires of the Ancient Orient: Symbols of Order in Eric Voegelin’s Order and History, Volume I on May 15-16, 2017 in Munich. If you are interested, please contact the…

    Read More

  • Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn as Writer, Philosopher, and Political Thinker

    March 18, 2017

    The Other Solzhenitsyn. Daniel J. Mahoney. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press, 2014.   Daniel J. Mahoney’s The Other Solzhenitsyn is a much needed reappraisal of the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s place as a writer, philosopher, and political thinker in the English-speaking world where he is caricatured as a…

    Read More

  • Two Critics of the Ideological "Lie": Raymond Aron and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

    March 17, 2017

    The Other Solzhenitsyn: Telling the Truth about a Misunderstood Writer and Thinker. Daniel J. Mahoney. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press, 2014.   The incomparable force of Solzhenitsyn is connected with his person, to what defines his message: the unconditional refusal of the lie. It can happen…

    Read More

  • Judging Communism and All Its Works: Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago Reconsidered

    March 15, 2017

    Macbeth’s self-justifications were feeble—and his conscience devoured him. Yes, even Iago was a little lamb, too. The imagination and the spiritual strength of Shakespeare’s villains stopped short at a dozen corpses. Because they had no ideology. Ideology—that is what gives villainy its long-sought justification and gives the…

    Read More

  • Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s Overcoming Personal, Political, and Historical Amnesia Through Literary-Aesthetic Anamnesis

    March 13, 2017

    As late as Nov 29, 1988, well into the Gorbachev period of ‘glasnost,’ Suslov’s successor and top party ideologist, Vadim Medvedev ‘confirmed Solzhenitsyn would remain on the Soviet Union’s blacklist of forbidden writers, saying that “to publish Solzhenitsyn’s work is to undermine the foundation on which our…

    Read More

  • Modernity Reconsidered : Multiple Modernities, Universal History and the Quest for a Civilizational Paradigm

    March 11, 2017

    In view of an unfolding global modernity, Voegelin  proposed “the empirical thesis that the philosophical investigation of the realm of phenomena has always drawn  its dynamism  from contemporary conflict situations. If today’s horizon of the phenomena in question is truly global, it is because the entire globe…

    Read More

  • Putin's Russia: Power and Postmodernity

    March 10, 2017

    Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man’s Fight for Justice. Bill Browder. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015. Putin’s Kleptocracy: Who Owns Russia? Karen Dawisha.New York: Simon & Schuster, 2014. The Fourth Political Theory. Alexander Dugin. London: Arktos, 2012. Eurasian Mission: An Introduction…

    Read More

  • The Special Relationship: United States-Russia

    March 8, 2017

    A special relationship between the United States and Russia existed during the period 2001–2002, after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. However, this relationship of cooperation quickly became adversarial and competitive because of diverging strategic interests. As the only country with the capacity…

    Read More

  • What Numbers Can and Cannot Tell Us about Russian Politics

    March 6, 2017

    New Trends in Russian Political Mentality: Putin 3.0. Elena Shestopal, ed. Lanham, Lexington Books, 2015.   Quantitative measures of political phenomena can be enormously appealing.  They seem to provide a parsimonious expression of political reality.  The “scientific” basis of quantitative methodology also lends to it a logical…

    Read More

  • The Political Science Reviewer

    March 5, 2017

    The Political Science Reviewer is a beacon in the often-murky world of professional political science journals. Unencumbered by any of the reigning orthodoxies, the PSR welcomes the evidence of empirical study, but upholds the primacy of theoretical understanding. The PSR is an annual journal featuring essay-length reviews of classic and contemporary studies in…

    Read More

Elena Shestopal Russia

New Trends in Russian Political Mentality: Putin 3.0. Elena Shestopal, ed. Lanham, Lexington Books, 2015.
 
Quantitative measures of political phenomena can be enormously appealing.  They seem to provide a parsimonious expression of political reality.  The "scientific" basis of quantitative methodology also lends to it a logical rigor not found in purely descriptive approaches of politics.   Unfortunately, they are often inaccurate. …

Read More ...

The Political Science Reviewer is a beacon in the often-murky world of professional political science journals. Unencumbered by any of the reigning orthodoxies, the PSR welcomes the evidence of empirical study, but upholds the primacy of theoretical understanding. The PSR is an annual journal featuring essay-length reviews of classic and contemporary studies in law and politics, as well as examinations of leading political science textbooks. Each…

Read More ...

Russia Religion 1

Russia's Lost Reformation: Peasants, Millennialism, and Radical Sects in Southern Russia and Ukraine, 1830-1917. Sergei I. Zhuk.  Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 2004.
 
Suppressed by both the Russian Orthodox Church and Soviet scholars, Russia's "radical reformation" has been lost and forgotten in recent historiography.  Zhuk resurrects this movement into our historical consciousness by primarily looking at two nineteenth-century groups: the…

Read More ...

Russia Religion 2

Religion, Morality, and Community in Post-Soviet Societies. Mark D. Steinberg and Catherine Wanner, ed. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008.
 
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, there has been a new prominence of religion throughout Eurasia in ethno-national identification, social practices, and public policies. Mark D. Steinberg’s and Catherine Wanner’s edited volume seeks to explore the…

Read More ...

Russia Orthodox Church

What will be the contribution of the Russian Orthodox Church to the creation of a civil society in post-Soviet Russia?  Much depends on whether the Russian Orthodox Church is a nationalist institution.  On the one hand, if the Russian Orthodox Church is in fact a nationalist institution, then its contribution to a democratic civil society will be negative; on the…

Read More ...

Russia 1

The Russian Empire, which lasted from 1721 to 1917, spanned an enormous territory of almost 14 million square miles (36 million sq km) across the eastern portion of Europe and the continent of Asia. Ruled by an autocratic government, with its capital at St. Petersburg, its 170 million people were of over 100 different ethnic backgrounds, comprised primarily of Christians,…

Read More ...

Amber Room Russia

The original Amber Room was in the Catherine Palace: it was a chamber with amber panels backed with gold leaf and mirrors.  It was created from 1701 to 1709 for the Prussian King Wilhelm I, who in turn gave it to Peter the Great (r. 1694-1725) in 1716 to form a Prussian-Russian alliance against Sweden.  The Amber Room remained there…

Read More ...

Russia Volgograd

The Russian Empire was one of the largest empires in the world, spanning almost 14 square miles (36 million sq km) across eastern portion of Europe and the continent of Asia.
The Russian Empire’s population was 170 million people of over 100 different ethnic and religious backgrounds.
The Russian Empire emerged as one of the great world powers and played a leading…

Read More ...

A Torch Kept Lit: Great Lives of the Twentieth Century. William F. Buckley with James Rosen, ed. New York: Crown Forum, 2016.
 
James Rosen provides the reader with a selection of obituaries written by William F. Buckley for National Review. The cast of characters memorialized include significant political figures, family, entertainers and artists, friends, and friends who were political adversaries.
It is…

Read More ...

Political Realism and Wisdom. András Lánczi. New York: Palgrave MacMillan Press, 2015.  P. 211.
 
András Lánczi’s latest English publication, Political Realism and Wisdom, consists of seven chapters, bookended by a short preface and conclusion, all loosely bound by the large-order themes of the work’s title. The manner in which the two threads are separated and collected—the dialectic, as it were, between…

Read More ...