Tag Archives: Arendt

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What I offer in these pages is not an “introduction to the reading of Voegelin” à la Alexandre Kojève with Hegel. Nor am I undertaking a strict study of the important concepts and ideas found in the works of Voegelin. In my opinion, these types of projects have failed to bring Voegelin a wider audience and I should therefore take…

Thinking in Public: Strauss, Levinas, and Arendt. Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016.
 
Thinking in Public examines what constitutes the public intellectual and the public role of philosophy by comparing three seminal figures of twentieth-century philosophy: Leo Strauss, Emmanuel Levinas, and Hannah Arendt. Each was a German-Jewish émigré and each was a student of Martin Heidegger, who had…

Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair. Bonnie Honig. New York: Fordham University Press, 2017.
 
Public Things examines how public practices, space, and objects can form a collective identity in an age of privatization and deregulation. Although she does not define public things, Honig gives examples like public universities, prisons, national parks, roads, the military, government, electrical and power sources, libraries, and radio…

There are many ways to arrive at an unknown destination. Some rely on a map and seldom diverge from the path they have planned out while others have a general idea of their route but prefer to stop along the way and ask locals for directions. Let us think of the course of history as one such trek in which…

In 1925, Hannah Arendt was a nineteen-year-old philosophy student at the University of Marburg.  She kept a journal, one fragment of which is titled “Shadows.”  It traces two paths within her psyche, each productive of a different future, with the option to choose between them.  On the first path she would renounce masks and psychic armor even at the price…

Ideology is a highly misunderstood concept.  People use it all the time to describe what, or more precisely, how they think despite the fact that they may not actually be engaged in the theoretical or practical application of ideology.  By doing this, they are unwittingly giving ideology power that it doesn’t deserve, and the word itself becomes a reality every…

In January, 2000, a 10 year old boy stood on the stage of the amphitheater in Fiesole, a small Etruscan-era hill-top town in the Italian province of Tuscany, and recited “In Flanders’ Fields,” the well-known paean to the dead at the second Battle of Ypres in 1915. A physician and second in command of the 1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery,…

De la bonne société. L. Strauss, E. Voegelin, H. Arendt. Le retour du politique en philosophie. Sylvie Courtine-Denamy. Paris: Éditions du Cerf, "La Nuit Surveillée" series, 2014.
 
As we review this work,[1] we must not forget the circumstances in which it was written: Sylvie Courtine-Denamy underwent arduous treatment for the cancer that took her life in October 2014, before she was…


Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss

Eric Voegelin, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt were all forced to flee Germany when that country fell under the sway of the National Socialists. They have been grouped together by hostile critics and by those who admired their work; their interpersonal relations have been the subject of gossip, speculation, and occasional analysis. Whatever the motives one…

It would take a very fat volume or two to do justice to the subject of Voegelin and his contemporaries. I would like to begin by indicating the magnitude of the problem more or less empirically by referring initially to Voegelin’s extensive correspondence. To begin with, it fills over forty boxes in the Hoover Institution archival collection. Second, the significance…