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Storytelling is universal; a constitutive, definitive part of human nature.[1] We imagine our earliest ancestors sitting around the fire telling tales of heroic adventures and otherworldly interventions. Examples of our earliest extant written texts are epic poems likely derived from oral storytelling. We become fascinated by stories that happened long ago or far away as children. Until the development of…

Flattering the Demos: Fiction and Democratic Education.  Marlene K. Sokolon and Travis D. Smith, eds. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2018.
 
This edited compilation by Marlene Sokolon and Travis Smith makes important contributions to the field of political science teaching. Concerned to understand better how the study of fiction through multiple genres can inform and shape democratic education, the editors begin these investigations…

The purpose of this course (and convention paper) is to call attention to the fact that political theory is rich in Asia, despite its heavy religious content (until modern times). Indeed, the encounter with political ideas in Asia is just as profound as it is in the West. In fact, since these ideas in Asia are heavily fertilized by their…

A friend of mine recently asked me how he should go about reading Samuel Johnson, the great 18th century English lexicographer, a man of many parts. I replied: “Find a good edition of Boswell’s Life of Johnson, one you can underline as you read it. Then sit down, begin on page one. Read a couple of pages every day or…

On Thursday, May 1, 1783, with “the young Mr. (Edmund) Burke” present, Samuel Johnson remarked: “It is strange that there should be so little reading in the world and so much writing. People in general do not willingly read if they can have anything else to amuse them.” The word “reading” here does not mean, say, the reading of e-mails, which…

The history of political philosophy is the history of education. Its content, its prospects, its goals—all receive copious attention, from Plato’s Republic to the Scholastics, from Locke and Rousseau to Nietzsche and Rawls.[1]  For education is a central concern to any political community, doing much to form the character, not only of citizens, but of the polity itself.
Among the less…

Introduction
Higher education institutions need to house their students and provide shelter for them while enrolled in school. This is known as residential life. Residential life is now a sophisticated auspice of the university and ubiquitous to campuses nationwide.
One common goal of residential life in higher education is building community. While this may sound simple, community is a highly nuanced concept…

Stating the Problem
Academic research in the field of assessment is replete with thoughtful analysis designed to offer us a multitude of ways to improve both our formative and summative assessment practices, as well as good advice about how we might adopt these practices to motivate, support, and evaluate student learning. However, let us suppose for a moment that by adopting…

The Trend towards Marginalizing Philosophy
“Philosophy of Education” or “Education Foundations” is not regularly offered as a core course in most B. Ed. Programs today. The eradication of Philosophy of Education from Teacher’s Colleges stems, in part, from a lack of vision, courage, and understanding among the elites who develop such professional programs on the one hand, but also from a…

I
What I offer in these pages is not an “introduction to the reading of Voegelin” à la Alexandre Kojève with Hegel. Nor am I undertaking a strict study of the important concepts and ideas found in the works of Voegelin. In my opinion, these types of projects have failed to bring Voegelin a wider audience and I should therefore take…