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A Case for Irony. Jonathan Lear (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011).
 
Today we often misunderstand irony for sarcasm, self-detachment, or cleverness instead as a source of potential knowledge that can disrupt the mundane routine of our lives. Jonathan Lear, the John U. Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee of Social Thought and the Department of Philosophy at the University…

In our new examination of Heidegger’s and Kierkegaard’s relationship of thinking we will realize that certain common aspects arise in their approach to the reality of the questions of philosophy of art. Neither of them brings any systematics to the concept of art and aesthetics (similarly to Nietzsche), in spite of this in their overall treatise of this area they…

Socrates Meets Kierkegaard: The Father of Philosophy Meets the Father of Christian Existentialism. Peter Kreeft. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press, 2014.
 
In his essay on Hegel, Eric Voegelin wrote that “the practice of philosophy in the Socratic-Platonic sense is the equivalent of the Christian sanctification of man; it is the growth of the image of God in man”. It is with…

Why Voegelin and Kierkegaard?
Why Voegelin and Kierkegaard? Both of them have pursued an intricate analysis of the structure of existence and of the various possibilities of exis­tence. Many aspects of their examinations are strikingly similar, notwithstand­ing their different technical vocabularies. They both have attempted a recovery of the classic philosophical attempt of the Socratic, while taking seriously the gains of…

Eric Voegelin and the Continental Tradition: Explorations in Modern Political Thought. Lee Trepanier and Steven F. McGuire, eds. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2011.
 
I am still waiting for a philosophical physician in the exceptional sense of that word–one who has to pursue the problem of the total health of a people, time, race, or of humanity–to muster the courage…

Plato directly and indirectly cautions his students that he does not commu­nicate with them straightforwardly. To repeat the warnings quoted previ­ously, Plato fiercely denies in his Seventh Letter that Dionysius II and other dubious individuals could have known that about which he is serious (περί ων εγώ σπουδάζω). They could not have understood it, "For there is no writing of…