Tag Archives: Leadership

HomePosts Tagged "Leadership"

Higher Calling: The Rise of Nontraditional Leaders in Academia. Scott C. Beardsley. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
 
According to Beardsley, a revolution is taking place among the leadership in American higher education: presidents, deans, and other administrators are coming from nontraditional paths than from the scholarly, tenure-track careers of the past. In 2012, 20% of all presidents came directly from…

Every leadership episode is unique, and we would do well to appreciate each contingent, concrete feature (Wren, 2012). We do have to notice, for example, the prevailing contexts (Wren & Swatez, 1995). Nevertheless, if we are to make any headway in leadership studies, we also have to detect and describe regularities and patterns, such that we derive lessons of general…

The philosopher Eric Voegelin labored for many years in relative obscurity until his death in 1985. Even now his disciples are drawn largely from conservative academe, which is so marginal as to be something of an oxymoron. Part of Voegelin’s obscurity, to be sure, is the inaccessibility of his prose. Despite occasional flights of poetry, he struggles for both clarity…

There is a common implication, in scholarly as well as popular literature, that although the leadership process may sometimes be political in nature the best leadership is somehow above politics. Indeed, the argument that leadership may be essentially and inherently political in nature has not been advanced in the scholarly literature. It is not surprising that this attitude should exist,…

Scholars, practitioners, and more casual observers of leadership often talk about Niccolo Machiavelli in the context of leadership practices.  Substantially fewer seem to be well read on the (in)famous Florentine.  It is possible to consider Machiavelli, his writings, and ideas reputed to him, in a better, more informed, less condemnatory and more positive light.  This essay will try to show…

Both Tocqueville and Weber confronted the injection of mass suffrage into the liberal democratic polity with trepidation and caution but for different reasons: for Tocqueville, democracy produced a condition of social equality and Cartesian pragmatism that could lead to individualism, cultural mediocrity, and ultimately majority tyranny, while for Weber the domination of administrative bureaucracy and its use of instrumental rationality…