Lee Trepanier

Written by Lee Trepanier

Lee Trepanier is a Professor of Political Science at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan where he teaches political philosophy, constitutional law, and American Politics. He is also the university's pre-law adviser and the author and editor of several books. He is a Board Member and editor of VoegelinView (2016-present) and the editor of Lexington Books series Politics, Literature, and Film (2013-present).

HomeArticles Posted by Lee Trepanier

Both deontological and classical liberalism have been criticized by communitarian thinkers who contend that liberalism is rooted in an incoherent conception of the self because it fails to take into account the communal aspect of our self-conception, thereby making the liberal doctrine of acquisitive individualism inadequate as a foundation of civic virtue for a community of free and equal citizens.[1]…

The Law Most Beautiful and Best: Medical Arguments and Magical Rhetoric in Plato's Laws. Randall Baldwin Clark. Lexington Books, 2003.
The analogy of politics and medicine guides Randall Baldwin Clark’s book The Law Most Beautiful and Best: Medical Arguments and Magical Rhetoric in Plato’s Laws. In addressing the question of how citizens can be best persuaded to obey the laws, Clark…

Knowing Persons: A Study in Plato. Lloyd P. Gerson, Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2003.
On the debate whether in antiquity the concept of the person is distinct from the concept of the human being, Lloyd P. Gerson falls into the camp that they are. In his Knowing Persons: A Study in Plato, Gerson presents a Plato who wants to distinguish persons…

Plato, Metaphysics and the Forms. Francis A. Grabowski III. New York/London: Continuum, 2008.
Grabowski approaches the Platonic theory of the Forms as an epistemological problem where he rejects the Forms as abstract universals and instead tentatively concludes that they are perfect particulars. For Grabowski, the Forms are a combination of the universals and particulars. However, as the author admits, Plato never…

Why Plato Wrote. Danielle S. Allen. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
As part of the Blackwell Bristol Lectures Series on Greece, Rome, and the Classical Tradition, Danielle S. Allen has produced an extraordinary book that not only offers an answer to the title question of her book, Why Plato Wrote, but also examines the nature of philosophical writing, the relationship between philosophy and politics, and…

The Ancient Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry. Raymond Barfield. Cambridge: University of Cambridge Press, 2011.

 
From its beginnings, philosophy’s language, concepts, and imaginative growth have been heavily influenced by poetry. Drawing upon the works of a wide range of thinkers throughout the history of Western philosophy, Barfield explores the pervasiveness of poetry’s impact on philosophy and, conversely, how philosophy has sometimes resisted…

The Musical Structure of Plato’s Dialogues. J.B. Kennedy. Acumen Press, 2011.
J.B. Kennedy’s The Musical Structure of Plato’s Dialogues seeks to establish that Plato divided some, if not all, of his dialogues into twelve equal sections. These twelve sections, Kennedy argues, correlate with the Pythagorean twelve division multi-octave musical scale. From his analysis of the Symposium and Euthyphro, Kennedy argues that Plato…

Plato: The Republic. Translated by R.E. Allen. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.
As with his other works on Plato’s dialogues, R. E. Allen’s translation of the Republic is a faithful, smooth-flowing, and intelligent rendition of the material for students and the general reader. For scholars, it is another major translation of Plato’s dialogue in the tradition of Cornford, Grube, Waterfield,…

The Republic. The Comprehensive Student Edition. Andrea Tschemplik. Rowman & Littlefield, 2005.
Tschempilk's The Republic is an excellent textbook for undergraduate students. It is based on the translation of John Llewelyn Davies and James Vaughan (1852), with the archaism and Briticism eliminated from the text. The book is organized in the traditional ten books with the Stephanus numbers. At the beginning of…

Plato’s Meno. Scott, Dominic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
As part of the Cambridge Studies in the Dialogues of Plato, Scott’s Plato’s Meno is an excellent contribution.  His approach to the dialogue is a balance between those commentators who discount the dramatic elements of the dialogue as mere dressage for analytical arguments and those who excessively focus on the drama at the…