Lee Trepanier

Written by Lee Trepanier

Lee Trepanier is a Professor of Political Science, Department Chair, and University Pre-Law Advisor at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan. He is author and editor of several books and also is the editor of VoegelinView (2016-present) and editor of Lexington Books series Politics, Literature, and Film (2013-present).

HomeArticles Posted by Lee Trepanier

Cents and Sensibility: What Economics Can Learn from the Humanities. Gary Saul Morson and Morton Schapiro. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017.
 
The crisis of the humanities has been well-covered with a decline in students enrolling in its programs, an oversupply of doctorates who cannot find an academic position, and a diminishment of respect for these subjects because there are no jobs…

The Novel After Film: Modernism and the Decline of Autonomy. Jonathan Foltz. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.
 
What is the novel after the invention of cinema? For Foltz, the relationship between the novel and film is a paradoxical one with both mediums indebted as well as distrustful of each other. The invention of cinematic narrative has forced novelists to recognize they…

Under the Cover: The Creation, Production, and Reception of a Novel. Clayton Childress. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017.
 
In Under the Cover, Childress examines the novel as a sociological cultural object with attention to three aspects: creation (art), production (commerce), and reception (meaning). Adopting field theory, Childress examines those group of people who orient their attention toward each other and similar…

Theory of the Novel. Guido Mazzoni. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2017.
 
Between the mid-sixteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth, the novel, which long considered to be a form of superficial entertainment, became the preeminent art form in the West because it portrayed the “totality of life” against the reductive accounts of science, philosophy, and other forms of systematic thought.…

The Work of Art: Value in Creative Careers. Alison Gerber. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2017.
 
In The Work of Art, Gerber shows how the “occupation turn” in the visual art world created confusion and tension over the value of art and the meaning of being an artist. Beginning in the 1960s, the professionalization of artists started and eventually became normalized in…

The Intimate Universal: The Hidden Porosity Among Religion, Art, Philosophy, and Politics. William Desmond. New York: Columbia University Press, 2016.
 
One tradition in western philosophy is the universal – a public space for thought, a communal forum for negotiating conflict, a neutral intermedium for science – and is represented in the works of the likes Plato, Aristotle, nominalists, and idealists. A…

Reputation: What it is and Why it Matters. Gloria Origgi. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018.
 
Reputation explains why reputation is both personally and socially important; how it circulates among people; and how it affects what others say about us. It is preoccupied with two fundamental philosophical questions: Can reputation be considered a rational motivation for action and can it be considered…

Productive Imagination. Saulius Geniusas and Dmitri Nikulin, eds. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2018.
 
How do we imagine ourselves and to what extent do we use our imagination in our conception of our social selves and social worlds?  These questions are the focus of Saulius Geniusas’ and Dmitri Nikulin’s edited collection, Productive Imagination. The book explores the productive imagination’s capacity to…

The Temporality of Political Obligation. Justin C. Mueller. New York: Routledge, 2016.
 
Theorists of political obligation are concerned with the reasons and under what conditions should people obey political authority, a problem that emerges in modernity in the works of Hobbes, Locke, Bentham, Kant, Mill, and subsequent political thinkers. Apologists for political obligation have attempted to describe and the defend the…

The Public Intellectual: Between Philosophy and Politics. Arthur M. Melzer, Jerry Weinberger, and M. Richard Zinman, eds. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.
 
This volume examines the role of the public intellectual in the West, striking a middle ground between those who view intellectuals as prophets who would lead us to the promise land if only we were to listen to them…