Lee Trepanier

Written by Lee Trepanier

Lee Trepanier is a Professor of Political Science at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan where he teaches political philosophy, constitutional law, and American Politics. He is also the university's pre-law adviser and the author and editor of several books. He is editor of VoegelinView (2016-present) and the editor of Lexington Books series Politics, Literature, and Film (2013-present).

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Technology 2 Science

The debate about scientism (also referred to as positivism or scientific reductionism) is an argument over the validity of applying the methods of the natural sciences to the social sciences. The desire of the positivist to purge the social sciences of its subjective element reveals his or her assumptions that reality consists only of immanent existence and that knowledge only…
Religion Christianity God Divine

Michael Allen Gillespie’s The Theological Origins of Modernity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.
 
Seeking to clarify what we mean by “modernity,” Michael Gillespie provides an intellectual history of the subject by reaching back to the late Middle Ages. Contrary to the accounts that present modernity as a radical break with the past based on reason, Gillespie provides a perspective that…
Window Church Religion Divine God Christianity

Beauty of the Infinite: The Aesthetics of Christian Truth. David Bentley Hart (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2003).
 
The Beauty of the Infinite is a complex and subtle work that presents an aesthetic defense of Christian rhetoric against those who embrace what David Bentley Hart calls “the metaphysics of violence”: the belief that life is inherently tragic with no possibility…
Poland US

With the declassification of secret material after the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union, scholars are able to determine how accurate were the perceptions of foreign policy-makers to the reality which they were analyzing. This chapter will explore the accuracy of the perceptions of the American foreign policy establishment – the White House, the State Department, and…
Ukraine

Introduction
This article is to examine the bilateral relationship between the U.S. and Ukraine at the end of the Cold War. During this period, the U.S. was concerned with a single issue in its relationship with Ukraine – denuclearization – and initially framed this relationship from a Russian-centric perspective. As a result, the U.S. achieved minimal results. Once it was able…
Russia USA

A special relationship between the United States and Russia existed during the period 2001–2002, after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. However, this relationship of cooperation quickly became adversarial and competitive because of diverging strategic interests. As the only country with the capacity to destroy the United States with its nuclear stockpile, Russia plays an important…
Russia Religion 1

Russia's Lost Reformation: Peasants, Millennialism, and Radical Sects in Southern Russia and Ukraine, 1830-1917. Sergei I. Zhuk.  Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 2004.
 
Suppressed by both the Russian Orthodox Church and Soviet scholars, Russia's "radical reformation" has been lost and forgotten in recent historiography.  Zhuk resurrects this movement into our historical consciousness by primarily looking at two nineteenth-century groups: the…
Russia Religion 2

Religion, Morality, and Community in Post-Soviet Societies. Mark D. Steinberg and Catherine Wanner, ed. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008.
 
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, there has been a new prominence of religion throughout Eurasia in ethno-national identification, social practices, and public policies. Mark D. Steinberg’s and Catherine Wanner’s edited volume seeks to explore the…
Russia Orthodox Church

What will be the contribution of the Russian Orthodox Church to the creation of a civil society in post-Soviet Russia?  Much depends on whether the Russian Orthodox Church is a nationalist institution.  On the one hand, if the Russian Orthodox Church is in fact a nationalist institution, then its contribution to a democratic civil society will be negative; on the…
Russia 1

The Russian Empire, which lasted from 1721 to 1917, spanned an enormous territory of almost 14 million square miles (36 million sq km) across the eastern portion of Europe and the continent of Asia. Ruled by an autocratic government, with its capital at St. Petersburg, its 170 million people were of over 100 different ethnic backgrounds, comprised primarily of Christians,…