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  • Martin Luther and the translation of the Bible into German

    October 18, 2017

    The very life of Martin Luther (1483-1546) manifested turbulence, over and over. From his troubled youth in Saxony (Erikson, 1958/1962), through his contretemps against the Roman Catholic Church, and on into a bitter, even scurrilous old age,  Luther trailed controversy, such that his name is readily associated with one…

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  • Politics Reformed: The Anglo-American Legacy of Covenant Theology

    October 17, 2017

    Politics Reformed: The Anglo-American Legacy of Covenant Theology. Glenn A. Moots. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2010.   I suspect that Glenn Moots is a great fan of Agatha Christie.  It is not that his book is a work of fiction, but it certainly does read like a…

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  • Politics Reformed: The Anglo-American Covenant Theology (Part II)

    October 17, 2017

    Reaching Limits: The Covenant in America A series of covenants joined together church, town, and commonwealth in New England. Many of the immigrants who followed afterward, particularly Presbyterians and Baptists who settled in the Middle Colonies, were already familiar with covenanting before they arrived in the New World.51No person…

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  • Politics Reformed: The Anglo-American Covenant Theology (Part I)

    October 16, 2017

    The Covenants from Abraham to David We will consider here the merits and limitations of covenantal social thinking and ask whether such ideas have relevance today. While the usual cast of characters is revisited, this study is not just about John Calvin or the English Puritans. They play a…

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  • Calvin, Gnosis, and Anti-Philosophy: Voegelin's Intepretation of the Reformation

    October 10, 2017

    The Reformation movements of fifteenth-century Europe have been variously described as a cultural advance, a civilizational disruption with continuities, a religious revival, a heresy of “invincible error and perfect good faith,” and a schism and “calamity.” In Karl Holl’s estimation, for example, it “enriched all areas of …

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  • An Agnostic View of Voegelin's Gnostic Calvin

    October 9, 2017

    The genius of Eric Voegelin is perhaps most apparent in his insight that the crisis of Modernity springs less from the naturalistic relativism that followed modem science than from unrestrained religious absolutism. The horrors of the twentieth century thus arise out of religious claims to truth. According to Voegelin,…

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The very life of Martin Luther (1483-1546) manifested turbulence, over and over. From his troubled youth in Saxony (Erikson, 1958/1962), through his contretemps against the Roman Catholic Church, and on into a bitter, even scurrilous old age,  Luther trailed controversy, such that his name is readily associated with one of the most divisive eras in European history.[1] The Western church…

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Glenn Moots Politics Reformed


Reaching Limits: The Covenant in America


A series of covenants joined together church, town, and commonwealth in New England. Many of the immigrants who followed afterward, particularly Presbyterians and Baptists who settled in the Middle Colonies, were already familiar with covenanting before they arrived in the New World.51No person or segment of society was left out of the series of covenants.…

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Glenn Moots Politics Reformed

The Covenants from Abraham to David

We will consider here the merits and limitations of covenantal social thinking and ask whether such ideas have relevance today. While the usual cast of characters is revisited, this study is not just about John Calvin or the English Puritans. They play a supporting role in the pursuit of a larger theological and political tradition…

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This is the seventh of a series of essays that will explore what prominent thinkers and philosophers can teach us about today’s public multiversity, the modern university with its many colleges, departments, and other administrative units that play multiple functions and roles in our society. This essay was originally published in Front Porch Republic on August 24, 2015.
 
In the previous…

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This is the sixth of a series of essays that will explore what prominent thinkers and philosophers can teach us about today’s public multiversity, the modern university with its many colleges, departments, and other administrative units that play multiple functions and roles in our society. This essay was originally published in Front Porch Republic on August 10, 2015.
 
In the…

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The Reformation movements of fifteenth-century Europe have been variously described as a cultural advance, a civilizational disruption with continuities, a religious revival, a heresy of "invincible error and [perhaps] perfect good faith," and a schism and "calamity." In Karl Holl's estimation, for example, it "enriched all areas of [European] culture," from theology and philosophy to art, from history to literature.…

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The genius of Eric Voegelin is perhaps most apparent in his insight that the crisis of Modernity springs less from the naturalistic relativism that followed modem science than from unrestrained religious absolutism. The horrors of the twentieth century thus arise out of religious claims to truth. According to Voegelin, there are two sides to this genesis. On the one hand,…

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This is the fifth of a series of essays that will explore what prominent thinkers and philosophers can teach us about today’s public multiversity, the modern university with its many colleges, departments, and other administrative units that play multiple functions and roles in our society. This essay was originally published in Front Porch Republic on July 31, 2015.
 
What I…

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Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea. Mark Blyth. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
 
Political theorists have long made the connection between politics and emotion. Plato, in his Republic, recognized both greed and anger as a central problem of political life. Early modern thinkers, like Machiavelli and Hobbes, recognized the importance of fear in political life.  Modern thinkers, like David Hume,…

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