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Higher Calling: The Rise of Nontraditional Leaders in Academia

Higher Calling: The Rise of Nontraditional Leaders in Academia

Higher Calling: The Rise of Nontraditional Leaders in Academia. Scott C. Beardsley. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017.   According to Beardsley, a revolution is taking place among the leadership...
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SoTL as a Subfield for Political Science Graduate Programs

SoTL as a Subfield for Political Science Graduate Programs

Today the discipline of political science is faced with the challenges of demonstrating its public worth, finding employment for its doctoral students, and discovering a common language among its specialists...
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Teaching American Politics in the Modern University

Teaching American Politics in the Modern University

You may be surprised to learn of the growing movement to dispense with the study of American politics as a distinct subfield of political science, but this is a real...
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35th International Meeting of THE ERIC VOEGELIN SOCIETY, 2019

35th International Meeting of THE ERIC VOEGELIN SOCIETY, 2019

35th International Meeting of THE ERIC VOEGELIN SOCIETY, 2019 American Political Science Association Meeting, August 29-September 1 Washington, DC   David Walsh, Meeting Director [email protected]   Dear Friends, I look...
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Higher Calling: The Rise of Nontraditional Leaders in Academia. Scott C. Beardsley. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
 
According to Beardsley, a revolution is taking place among the leadership in American higher education: presidents, deans, and other administrators are coming from nontraditional paths than from the scholarly, tenure-track careers of the past. In 2012, 20% of all presidents came directly from…

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Today the discipline of political science is faced with the challenges of demonstrating its public worth, finding employment for its doctoral students, and discovering a common language among its specialists (APSA 2014, 2015a, 2015b; Beltran et al. 2004; Brown-Dean 2015; Lupia 2014;  PS: Political Science & Politics 2015).[1] To address this situation, I recommend that political science departments create the…

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You may be surprised to learn of the growing movement to dispense with the study of American politics as a distinct subfield of political science, but this is a real and troubling challenge facing professors of political science today. Citing the increasingly global integration of politics, economics, and culture, a significant number of political scientists argue that faculty should no…

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The problem with reforms is that they almost always are thinly-veiled programs of revolutionary action. Sold as corrections of abuses, reforms generally aim to subvert existing institutions and replace them with the latest plan to achieve Progress through centralized planning. Our society’s transformation from one of dedication to family, faith, and freedom to one of individualism and dependence in the…

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Timelessness of Proust: Reflections on In Search of Lost Time. Charles R. Embry and Glenn Hughes, eds. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press, 2019.
 
This volume offers a philosophical-spiritual viewpoint that complements with its insights the masses of literary studies published on the work of Marcel Proust for over at least a hundred years. Much of it focuses on the narrator…

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In a democracy, we get the politicians we deserve. Apparently we deserve many leaders, but no statesmen. We may be happy or unhappy about the policies a politician promotes, and we may vote this way or that depending on who we think will best promote our interests. No one today, however, seems very happy about the personal caliber of our…

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Unlike other disciplines in the humanities, American political science since the 1950s has been concerned with establishing a scientific identity, drawing from the philosophy of logical positivism to establish empirical models to explain political behavior.[1] This “behavioral revolution” in the discipline reconceived science as a process of building definitions and taxonomies upon observed experience and moving from description to eventual…

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This chapter proposes an alternative to contemporary liberal education, by specifying a form of liberal arts education that is fit for the 21st century. We begin with the classical period to ascertain what the founders of “liberal arts education” meant by the term. The classical authors distinguish two types of arts or main subjects of study. They hold that the…

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The decline of the humanities in American higher education – literature, history, philosophy, classical studies, linguistics, and foreign languages – is most recently evident in the drop in enrollments from 17.2% of degrees in 1967 to 6.5% in 2013.[1] Further proof of this decline is the decreasing number of academic positions available in these disciplines. For instance, in the 2013-14…

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