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  • Permanent Liminality and Modernity

    July 22, 2017

    Permanent Liminality and Modernity: Analysing the Sacrificial Carnival through Novels. Arpad Szakolczai. Abingdon, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2017. As in the previous review, I’ll just select some of the novelists studied in Permanent Liminality and Modernity: Analysing the Sacrificial Carnival through Novels (hereafter PL), hoping thereby to convey…

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  • Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets

    July 21, 2017

    Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets. Svetlana Alexievich, tr. Bela Shayevich.  New York: Random House, 2016.   One of Dostoevsky’s more profound and even prophetic philosophical questions is posed by Ivan, the intellectual, to his younger brother Alyosha, the aspiring monk, in The Brothers Karamazov: Would he find…

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  • Flaubert’s Tentation de Saint-Antoine: Three Approaches (Part II)

    July 20, 2017

    La Tentation from a Girardian perspective. Flaubert in La Tentation has confronted the epoch, summed up in Anthony’s spiritual tribulation, in which archaic sacredness, passing through the urbanity of Hellenistic culture and mixing itself with the charisma of the Roman Empire, must acknowledge the new dispensation that accretes around…

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  • Flaubert’s Tentation de Saint-Antoine: Three Approaches (Part I)

    July 19, 2017

    Introduction: A Nameless Genre.  Gustave Flaubert’s Tentation de Saint-Antoine ou la révélation de l’âme (first version 1848; final version 1874), its sui generis character notwithstanding, belongs in a recognizable, yet largely unrecognized, genre of mid- and late-Nineteenth Century literature that includes, among other items, Charles Kingsley’s Hypatia (1850), Henrik…

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  • “Glory is My Work: Mary Oliver’s Search for Order” (Part II)

    July 18, 2017

    In Oliver’s longest poem, The Leaf and the Cloud, questioning about the meaning of beauty unfolds into an inquiry into the meaning of life and death.  The poet expresses her passionate love of beauty by asking what it is about beauty that stimulates the intensity in her soul that…

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  • “Glory is My Work: Mary Oliver’s Search for Order” (Part I)

    July 17, 2017

    Eric Voegelin developed a rich body of concepts for interpreting literary symbols.  This essay will use those concepts to interpret some of the verse of the contemporary American poet Mary Oliver.  “The poem most popular today is the fairly brief lyric poem” (APH 84).  Oliver’s oeuvre consists almost exclusively…

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  • Novels and the Sociology of the Contemporary

    July 15, 2017

    Novels and the Sociology of the Contemporary. Arpad Szakolczai. Abingdon, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2016. Arpad Szakolczai is Professor of Sociology at University College Cork, and the first book’s subtitle is The Sociology of the Contemporary (hereafter NS) while the second occurs within a Contemporary Liminality Series. Still, all…

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  • 33rd International Meeting of THE ERIC VOEGELIN SOCIETY, San Francisco 2017

    May 28, 2017

    33rd International Meeting of THE ERIC VOEGELIN SOCIETY, 2017 American Political Science Association Meeting,August 31-September 3 San Francisco, CA   David Walsh, Meeting Director [email protected]   Dear Friends, This is our program as it currently stands.  Please continue to update me with any changes that become necessary.  At this…

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Permanent Liminality and Modernity: Analysing the Sacrificial Carnival through Novels. Arpad Szakolczai. Abingdon, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2017.
As in the previous review, I’ll just select some of the novelists studied in Permanent Liminality and Modernity: Analysing the Sacrificial Carnival through Novels (hereafter PL), hoping thereby to convey at least an important thread underlying his investigation—this reviewer has to confess…

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Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets. Svetlana Alexievich, tr. Bela Shayevich.  New York: Random House, 2016.
 
One of Dostoevsky’s more profound and even prophetic philosophical questions is posed by Ivan, the intellectual, to his younger brother Alyosha, the aspiring monk, in The Brothers Karamazov: Would he find the torture of one child acceptable if it was somehow the necessary means…

Read More ...

Flaubert Tentation de Saint-Antoine

La Tentation from a Girardian perspective.
Flaubert in La Tentation has confronted the epoch, summed up in Anthony’s spiritual tribulation, in which archaic sacredness, passing through the urbanity of Hellenistic culture and mixing itself with the charisma of the Roman Empire, must acknowledge the new dispensation that accretes around the Passion of Christ and takes the form of a unique non-sacrificial…

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Flaubert Tentation de Saint-Antoine

Introduction: A Nameless Genre. 
Gustave Flaubert’s Tentation de Saint-Antoine ou la révélation de l’âme (first version 1848; final version 1874), its sui generis character notwithstanding, belongs in a recognizable, yet largely unrecognized, genre of mid- and late-Nineteenth Century literature that includes, among other items, Charles Kingsley’s Hypatia (1850), Henrik Ibsen’s Kejser og Galileer (1871), Richard Wagner’s incomplete Jesus von Nazareth…

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Mary Oliver

In Oliver’s longest poem, The Leaf and the Cloud, questioning about the meaning of beauty unfolds into an inquiry into the meaning of life and death.  The poet expresses her passionate love of beauty by asking what it is about beauty that stimulates the intensity in her soul that breaks forth in her making of poems and in her worshipful…

Read More ...

Mary Oliver

Eric Voegelin developed a rich body of concepts for interpreting literary symbols.  This essay will use those concepts to interpret some of the verse of the contemporary American poet Mary Oliver.  “The poem most popular today is the fairly brief lyric poem” (APH 84).[1]  Oliver’s oeuvre consists almost exclusively of such poetry.  Thus it will be appropriate to begin by…

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Novels and the Sociology of the Contemporary. Arpad Szakolczai. Abingdon, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2016.
Arpad Szakolczai is Professor of Sociology at University College Cork, and the first book’s subtitle is The Sociology of the Contemporary (hereafter NS) while the second occurs within a Contemporary Liminality Series. Still, all of Szakolczai’s work seems to effortlessly go beyond what’s conventionally regarded as…

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LaLa Land

Did you ever catch yourself dreaming, adrift in la-la land—only to wake up to your own, personal so-so city? A consoling (but sophistic) thought: The number of possible worlds is infinite, so there’s some possible you out there for whom your daydreamt world is actual. Isn’t it nice to know a parallel possible you get to really enjoy it? You…

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Hacksaw Ridge

In war, sitting out protects one’s bodily safety. Sitting out of the morally messy struggles typical of adult human life
protects one’s sense of superiority and innocence. Doing the good sometimes requires an odd courage: accepting
the risk of getting the soul’s hands dirty. But how and how much to dirty one’s hands are difficult to discern.
Mel Gibson’s good but gory (and…

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Manchester by the Sea

Every person undergoes traumatic experiences. Their quantity and quality vary, but once suffered, these experiences are incorporated into the person, usually invisibly to the rest of us. When they are not hidden enough, we may wish a person would just get over it already. Yet we marvel, when a person calmly reveals some past trauma, at the human ability seemingly…

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