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  • Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy

    February 25, 2018

    Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. Peter Olsthoorn. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 2015.   Brutus: I would not, Cassius, yet I love well. But wherefore do you hold me here so long? What is it that you would impart to me? If it be aught toward the…

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  • How to Recover China’s Censored Reality

    February 24, 2018

    Surviving the State, Remaking the Church: A Sociological Portrait of Christians in Mainland China. Li Ma and Jin Li. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications (Wipf and Stock Publishers), 2017.   For people whose country is known for censorship and self-censorship, writing in a foreign language is like taking refuge in…

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  • Thomas Varacalli’s Review of My book “Towards a Science of States: their Evolution and Properties”

    February 23, 2018

    To a large extent I appreciate Thomas Varacalli’s review of my book “Towards a Science of States: their Evolution and Properties”. Most important, perhaps, is that we agree about the present crisis in the political science discipline, a crises which according to Varacalli consists in a conflict between empiricists…

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  • Towards a Science of States: Their Evolution and Properties

    February 23, 2018

    Towards a Science of States: Their Evolution and Properties. Erik Moberg. Moberg Publications, 2014.   The discipline of political science is in crisis.  Since the end of the Second World War, empiricists and political philosophers have battled for the soul of the discipline. The former group has clearly won…

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  • The Witches of Macbeth: A Weyward Translation

    February 22, 2018

    Imagine a smoking cauldron rising from the trapdoor of the Globe’s center stage as you hear echoes of thunder from the attics. Three bearded men cloaked in black rags and tattered capes slink onto the stage as they chant. It might be the middle of the afternoon, but Shakespeare…

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  • Sources, Scholarship, and Sense: Shakespeare’s Use of Holinshed in Macbeth

    February 21, 2018

    1 The study of sources and influences suffers a bad reputation in Shakespearean scholarship, for the most part, deservedly so.  Earlier generations of scholars too much entangled themselves in the literary genetics of Shakespeare’s plays or enraptured themselves in contemplating the creative impulses of the great bard’s mind.  They…

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  • Shakespeare after Theory

    February 20, 2018

    Shakespeare after Theory. David Scott Kastan. New York: Routledge, 1999.   Theory is dead—if the title is the message of David Scott Kastan, English professor at Columbia University, distinguished critic and editor, anthologizer of contemporary criticism, and prominent proponent and practitioner of New Historicism. If so, this twenty-odd-year-old orthodoxy, which…

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  • Shakespeare’s Unorthodox Biography: The Epitome of Anti-Stratfordian Scholarship

    February 19, 2018

    Shakespeare’s Unorthodox Biography: The Epitome of Anti-Stratfordian Scholarship. Diana Price. Santa Barbara: Praeger, 2000.   1: Overview I do not care who wrote the plays conventionally attributed, in part or in whole, to William Shakespeare of Stratford and of London.  For me, the play’s the thing.  Yet I have…

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  • The Shakespeare Authorship Question: E Pluribus Unum

    February 19, 2018

    Questions about the Question 1 To my students who asked me whether Shakespeare wrote the plays attributed to him, I answered, no: they were written by another man with the same name.  To the public who ask this question, anti-Stratfordians answer, no: they were written by another man who…

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Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. Peter Olsthoorn. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 2015.
 
Brutus:
I would not, Cassius, yet I love [Caesar] well.
But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honor in one eye and death i’ th’ other,
And I will look on both indifferently;…

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Surviving the State, Remaking the Church: A Sociological Portrait of Christians in Mainland China. Li Ma and Jin Li. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications (Wipf and Stock Publishers), 2017.
 
For people whose country is known for censorship and self-censorship, writing in a foreign language is like taking refuge in a free country.
For the author of this review and those of the new…

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To a large extent I appreciate Thomas Varacalli’s review of my book “Towards a Science of States: their Evolution and Properties”. Most important, perhaps, is that we agree about the present crisis in the political science discipline, a crises which according to Varacalli consists in a conflict between empiricists and political philosophers about the soul of the discipline. And therefore,…

Read More ...

Towards a Science of States: Their Evolution and Properties. Erik Moberg. Moberg Publications, 2014.
 
The discipline of political science is in crisis.  Since the end of the Second World War, empiricists and political philosophers have battled for the soul of the discipline. The former group has clearly won most of the battles through force of arms, though political philosophy defiantly remains…

Read More ...

1
The study of sources and influences suffers a bad reputation in Shakespearean scholarship, for the most part, deservedly so.  Earlier generations of scholars too much entangled themselves in the literary genetics of Shakespeare’s plays or enraptured themselves in contemplating the creative impulses of the great bard’s mind.  They too little engaged in interpreting his plays.  Nevertheless, the repudiation of misdirected…

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Shakespeare after Theory. David Scott Kastan. New York: Routledge, 1999.
 
Theory is dead—if the title is the message of David Scott Kastan, English professor at Columbia University, distinguished critic and editor, anthologizer of contemporary criticism, and prominent proponent and practitioner of New Historicism. If so, this twenty-odd-year-old orthodoxy, which claims theory as its major achievement, is also dead, or so Kastan seems…

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Shakespeare’s Unorthodox Biography: The Epitome of Anti-Stratfordian Scholarship. Diana Price. Santa Barbara: Praeger, 2000.
 
1: Overview
I do not care who wrote the plays conventionally attributed, in part or in whole, to William Shakespeare of Stratford and of London.  For me, the play’s the thing.  Yet I have read a few orthodox biographies; a few unorthodox biographies, including both editions (2001, 2012)…

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Questions about the Question
1
To my students who asked me whether Shakespeare wrote the plays attributed to him, I answered, no: they were written by another man with the same name.  To the public who ask this question, anti-Stratfordians answer, no: they were written by another man who used his name to conceal his own identity.  My quip is their quest.
The…

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This week, the Trump Administration proposed a $14-billion cut in funding to USAID and other State Department programs designed to help struggling economies around the world. In response to a similar proposal last year, Secretary of Defense James Mattis told members of Congress at a National Security Advisory council meeting, “If you don’t fund the State Department fully, then I…

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