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Hitler’s Monsters: A Supernatural History of the Third Reich. Eric Kurlander. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2017.
 
Reading Eric Kurlander’s Hitler’s Monsters awoke my memory of working with Detlev Clemens on another Eric, Voegelin’s Hitler and the Germans lectures, and sent me back to one of the books Kurlander refers to, Klaus Vondung’s 1971 Magie und Manipulation: Ideologischer Kult und…

Please see Tilo Schabert's two lectures, available on YouTube.
His lecture on "The German Revolution 1989." It is available here.
His lecture about the 2017 French Presidential election. It can be found here.
 
Also available are "A Wise French Accommodation," "The German Question is a European Question," "How the World is Made: France and the Reunification of Germany" and "True Form of Government: Plato…


All forms of political order are phenomena of movements.
The classic typology of political constitutions that Plato elaborated and Aristotle modified to an extent therefore represents both: a description of the different constitutions identified – monarchy, aristocracy, oligarchy, and so forth – and the passages from one constitutional form to another, as from an aristocracy to an oligarchy, for example. In…

The Venice Roundtable

François Mitterrand related the following episode several times af­terward – to SPD [The German Social Democratic Party] president Hans-Jochen Vogel, Spanish prime minister Felipe González, German chancellor Helmut Kohl, and West German minister of foreign affairs Hans-Dietrich Genscher, and in Cabinet meet­ings. What he had heard the evening of June 8, 1987, in Venice clearly made quite an…

A Critical Assessment[1]
Apparently, historiography takes shape in the form of battles. It began at historiography's beginning,[2] when, to cite the most telling example, Cicero called Herodotus the “father of history”[3] and Plutarch branded him as “a liar”.[4] The conflictual habits in historical writing have been lasting ever since.[5] An actual and indeed remarkable case in point is the historiography concerning…

The Protestant Reformation has been cited by scholars of European history as contributing to the rise of nationalism, individualism, capitalism, and secularism but not to the development of law, institutions, and legal science (23).1 Contrary to the current scholarship, Berman contended that these phenomena—nationalism, individualism, capitalism, and secularism—emerged after the decline of Protestant (and Roman Catholic) Christianity in the nineteenth…

The address which I am to deliver to you today was originally not planned as part of this series of lectures on "The German Univer­sity and the Third Reich.'' His Magnificence1 was so gracious as to invite me personally to give this address that out of respect for the office of rector I couldn't decline such an invitation. Had I,…

According to the popular idea, [democracy] is a form of government where the government does what the people want; and the people secure a government which acts according to their interests by participating in governmental procedure through the election of legislative representatives and executive and judicial officers who depend for their reelection on the conduct of affairs while they hold…

[Through seeking] the divine, the loving reaching out beyond ourselves toward the divine in the philosoph­ical experience and the loving encounter through the Word in the pneumatic experience, man participates in the divine. The concepts are methexis in Greek, participatio in Latin, participation in the di­vine. Insofar as man shares in the divine, insofar, that is to say, as he…

The Apocalypse in Germany. Klaus Vondung with Stephen D. Ricks, trans. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2000.
 
Apocalyptic thought is not restricted to the realm of religion but is a more general phenomenon: it is concerned with fear of, or hope for, a definite catastrophe or the end of the world. The expected catastrophe, however, is at the same time the…