David R. Weaver

Written by David R. Weaver

David Weaver is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Saginaw Valley State University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati in Political Science. His major areas of interest include foreign relations and political development, political thought and theory, and, primarily, leadership and democratic theory and practice.

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In 1911, L. T. Hobhouse published his brief Liberalism meant for his home audience in Great Britain but it eventually came to be considered a classic treatment of the emergent “social liberalism” of the 20th century.  It remains a lucid, accessible, and generally persuasive statement of evolving liberal principles and thinking, despite the passage of over a century.  Hobhouse clearly…

Thomas Paine is perhaps best known for his effective pamphleteering during the American Revolution, especially in “Common Sense” and “Crisis.” But his major book-length works, “The Rights of Man” and “The Age of Reason”, which articulated his views on political rights and religion, were less well received by many.  The Age of Reason, in particular,  earned him considerable enmity in…
Leadership

There is a common implication, in scholarly as well as popular literature, that although the leadership process may sometimes be political in nature the best leadership is somehow above politics. Indeed, the argument that leadership may be essentially and inherently political in nature has not been advanced in the scholarly literature. It is not surprising that this attitude should exist,…
Machiavelli 3

Scholars, practitioners, and more casual observers of leadership often talk about Niccolo Machiavelli in the context of leadership practices.  Substantially fewer seem to be well read on the (in)famous Florentine.  It is possible to consider Machiavelli, his writings, and ideas reputed to him, in a better, more informed, less condemnatory and more positive light.  This essay will try to show…
Dont' Tread on Me Libertarian

According to Wikipedia, libertarianism is described as follows:
"The term libertarianism originally referred to a philosophical belief in free will but later became associated with anti-state socialism and Enlightenment-influenced[8][9] political movements critical of institutional authority believed to serve forms of social domination and injustice. While it has generally retained its earlier political usage as a synonym for either social or individualist…