Nathan Harter

Written by Nathan Harter

Nathan Harter is an Associate Editor of VoegelinView and a Professor of Leadership Studies at Christopher Newport University. He is author of three books, with the latest being Foucault on Leadership: The Leader as Subject (Routledge, 2016).

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From Benito Mussolini to Hugo Chavez: Intellectuals and a Century of Political Hero Worship. Paul Hollander. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom. 2017. 318 pages.[1]
 
Paul Hollander fled his native Hungary after the 1956 revolution and became an American academic with a recurring interest in the pathologies associated with communism. He earned the Ph.D. from Princeton University and a B.A. from the…

Introduction
In 1944, the American Political Science Review published a short essay by Eric Voegelin titled “Political Theory and the Pattern of General History” – subsequently reprinted in The Collected Works of Eric Voegelin.[1] In it, Voegelin set forth a critique of existing histories of political ideas, claiming that they were outdated and built on a faulty premise that there can…

The philosopher Eric Voegelin labored for many years in relative obscurity until his death in 1985. Even now his disciples are drawn largely from conservative academe, which is so marginal as to be something of an oxymoron. Part of Voegelin’s obscurity, to be sure, is the inaccessibility of his prose. Despite occasional flights of poetry, he struggles for both clarity…

The very life of Martin Luther (1483-1546) manifested turbulence, over and over. From his troubled youth in Saxony (Erikson, 1958/1962), through his contretemps against the Roman Catholic Church, and on into a bitter, even scurrilous old age,  Luther trailed controversy, such that his name is readily associated with one of the most divisive eras in European history.[1] The Western church…

Is Scholarship a "Product"?
New university faculty want to know what scholarship is in order to go do it. Not unreasonably, they are asking for a target. If "X" constitutes scholarship and the job requires that faculty engage in scholarship, then new faculty conclude that their own work must resemble "X." This is not an irrational position to take. Nevertheless, let…