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In the previous essay I examined how Renaissance Humanism and the religious reformations can contribute to improving the multiversity as an institution that promotes the public good rather than being an academic patchwork that is sown together by specialized disciplines that only speak to themselves. Each of these movements sought a new paradigm to educate its members: Renaissance Humanism’s civic…

In the previous chapter, McGuire illuminates how Voegelin’s analysis of Aristotle shows that ethics and politics are to be based on one’s noetic participation in an nonobjective, transcendent reality rather than founded on a third-person or objective account of human nature.[1] In spite of McGuire’s agreement with Voegelin’s interpretation of Aristotle, he expresses reservation about Voegelin’s methodology, his philosophy of…

The Theological Origins of Modernity. Michael Allen Gillespie. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

 
One of the most substantial contributions to the discussion about the nature of modernity comes from Duke University professor Michael Allen Gillespie. The academic community is already well acquainted with his courageous incursions into intellectual history, such as his 1995 analysis, Nihilism before Nietzsche, and his…

Well, existence is not a fact. If anything, existence is the nonfact of a disturbing movement in the In-Between of ignorance and knowledge, of time and timelessness, of imperfection and perfection, of hope and fulfillment, and ultimately of life and death. From the experience of this movement, from the anxiety of losing the right direction in this In-Between of darkness and…