Tag Archives: Voegelin

HomePosts Tagged "Voegelin"
Flaubert Tentation de Saint-Antoine

La Tentation from a Girardian perspective.
Flaubert in La Tentation has confronted the epoch, summed up in Anthony’s spiritual tribulation, in which archaic sacredness, passing through the urbanity of Hellenistic culture and mixing itself with the charisma of the Roman Empire, must acknowledge the new dispensation that accretes around the Passion of Christ and takes the form of a unique non-sacrificial…
Flaubert Tentation de Saint-Antoine

Introduction: A Nameless Genre. 
Gustave Flaubert’s Tentation de Saint-Antoine ou la révélation de l’âme (first version 1848; final version 1874), its sui generis character notwithstanding, belongs in a recognizable, yet largely unrecognized, genre of mid- and late-Nineteenth Century literature that includes, among other items, Charles Kingsley’s Hypatia (1850), Henrik Ibsen’s Kejser og Galileer (1871), Richard Wagner’s incomplete Jesus von Nazareth…
Mary Oliver

Eric Voegelin developed a rich body of concepts for interpreting literary symbols.  This essay will use those concepts to interpret some of the verse of the contemporary American poet Mary Oliver.  “The poem most popular today is the fairly brief lyric poem” (APH 84).[1]  Oliver’s oeuvre consists almost exclusively of such poetry.  Thus it will be appropriate to begin by…
Voegelin Strauss Correspondence Cooper

Faith and Political Philosophy the Correspondence between Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin, 1934-1964. Peter Emberley and Barry Cooper, ed. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2004.
Eric Voegelin’s Dialogues with the Postmoderns Searching for Foundations. Peter A. Petrakis and Cecil Eubanks, ed. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2004.
 
With Collected Works of Eric Voegelin complete, the University of Missouri Press have…
Trepanier McGuire Voegelin

Eric Voegelin (1901-85) is often portrayed as one of the severest critics of modernity–its belief in human reason’s ability to understand and convey the fundamental structures of reality and its dismissal of transcendent teleologies as private and suspect beliefs. For Voegelin, modernity was a “Gnostic revolt” against reality: the belief that human beings can transform the nature of reality through…

The motivations of my work . . . arise from the political situation.  Anybody with an informed and reflective mind who lives in the twentieth century since the end of the First World War . . . finds himself hemmed in, if not oppressed, from all sides by a flood of ideological language.[1]
 
Responding to the dramatic political upheavals of his…
Lascaux

Since Voegelin has said that the reality of experience is self-interpretive, let’s turn this question around and ask, how did the earliest humans think about origins. I’ll draw on Voegelin’s well-known reflections on symbolization to remind us of the kind of expressions of that early thinking about origins we’ll be dealing with here:
For, in the first place, the symbols are…
Foucault

In the previous chapter, McGuire illuminates how Voegelin’s analysis of Aristotle shows that ethics and politics are to be based on one’s noetic participation in an nonobjective, transcendent reality rather than founded on a third-person or objective account of human nature.[1] In spite of McGuire’s agreement with Voegelin’s interpretation of Aristotle, he expresses reservation about Voegelin’s methodology, his philosophy of…
Aristotle 6

Any student of Aristotle’s thought will be familiar with his various definitions of human nature: in the Politics he tells us “man is by nature a political animal”; in the Metaphysics he defines the human being as a “rational animal”; in De Anima he describes us as a composite of body and soul, of matter and form, respectively. These definitions…