Lee Trepanier

Written by Lee Trepanier

Lee Trepanier is a Professor of Political Science and University Pre-Law Advisor at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan. He is author and editor of several books and also is the editor of VoegelinView (2016-present) and editor of Lexington Books series Politics, Literature, and Film (2013-present).

HomeArticles Posted by Lee Trepanier (Page 3)

New Television: The Aesthetics and Politics of a Genre. Martin Shuster. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017.
 
Martin Shuster’s New Television: The Aesthetics and Politics of a Genre makes the case that recent television programming, from the mid-1990s to today, constitute serious works of art as part of the genre of television and the moving image. Working in the tradition of…

Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. 20th Anniversary. Neil Postman with a new introduction by Andrew Postman. New York: Penguin Books, 1985.
 
In spite being published thirty-four years ago, Neil Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death is more relevant today than it was published in 1985, although the nature of the medium has changed from television…

Privacy and How to Get It Back. B.J. Mendelson. London: Curious Reads, 2017.
 
With the ubiquity of information technology in our lives, the question of privacy is often neglected by consumers, citizens, private companies, and governments. In Privacy and How to Get It Back, Mendelson pulls back the curtain to show us how government regulations are insufficient to protect us from…

In the past people looked to religion or the arts for divine inspiration and a sense of wonder; today we look to technology, the gods of our age, for answers. Except for a few, people do not understand how information technology actually works while becoming more dependent on it for running our lives. For example, when we don’t know something,…

Cents and Sensibility: What Economics Can Learn from the Humanities. Gary Saul Morson and Morton Schapiro. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017.
 
The crisis of the humanities has been well-covered with a decline in students enrolling in its programs, an oversupply of doctorates who cannot find an academic position, and a diminishment of respect for these subjects because there are no jobs…

The Novel After Film: Modernism and the Decline of Autonomy. Jonathan Foltz. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.
 
What is the novel after the invention of cinema? For Foltz, the relationship between the novel and film is a paradoxical one with both mediums indebted as well as distrustful of each other. The invention of cinematic narrative has forced novelists to recognize they…

Under the Cover: The Creation, Production, and Reception of a Novel. Clayton Childress. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017.
 
In Under the Cover, Childress examines the novel as a sociological cultural object with attention to three aspects: creation (art), production (commerce), and reception (meaning). Adopting field theory, Childress examines those group of people who orient their attention toward each other and similar…

Theory of the Novel. Guido Mazzoni. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2017.
 
Between the mid-sixteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth, the novel, which long considered to be a form of superficial entertainment, became the preeminent art form in the West because it portrayed the “totality of life” against the reductive accounts of science, philosophy, and other forms of systematic thought.…

The Work of Art: Value in Creative Careers. Alison Gerber. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2017.
 
In The Work of Art, Gerber shows how the “occupation turn” in the visual art world created confusion and tension over the value of art and the meaning of being an artist. Beginning in the 1960s, the professionalization of artists started and eventually became normalized in…

The Intimate Universal: The Hidden Porosity Among Religion, Art, Philosophy, and Politics. William Desmond. New York: Columbia University Press, 2016.
 
One tradition in western philosophy is the universal – a public space for thought, a communal forum for negotiating conflict, a neutral intermedium for science – and is represented in the works of the likes Plato, Aristotle, nominalists, and idealists. A…