Tag Archives: Catholic

HomePosts Tagged "Catholic"

The mystery of the liturgy coincides totally with the mystery of operativity
- Giorgio Agamben
 
In my opinion, Giorgio Agamben is the most important contemporary European theorist.  Political theology in the anarchist tradition, to which Agamben subscribes, has for its goal the exorcism of theology from political economy.
Though Agamben is a leftist, his argument is in the spirit of Eric Voegelin –…

Pope Francis, in his wise reflections on holiness in Gaudete et Exsultate (“Rejoice and Be Glad”), discusses Gnosticism and Pelagianism as “two subtle enemies of holiness.”
The Pope calls them “anthropocentric immanentism disguised as Catholic truth.” That is, they are both unhealthy patterns by which humans stay focused on themselves and on worldly concerns.
His discussion of Gnosticism notes how its essential…

In the past essays I have spoken about one of the obstacles that today’s multiversity confronts: the creation of the conditions of genuine learning. The vast creation of the mighty machinery of staff, administrators, and even faculty themselves have swollen to such proportions in the multiversity where the continuous contact between student and teacher is rare; and, if does transpire,…

Professor Karol Wojtyla, who became Pope John Paul II, was first of all a philosopher, a pre-eminent one, on par with any and all great philosophers in the history of this discipline. An attestation to this claim is that the Wadsworth Press has included a short book, On Karol Wojtyla, in its Wadsworth Philosophers Series.1 Because Wojtyla’s philosophizing is based…

The December 2016 issue of Quadrant includes my reflection on Pope Francis’s contribution to Catholic social and political reflection. I write as both a Catholic and a student of political philosophy, one who respects the person and office of the Pope, but who is troubled by Pope Francis’s increasing tendency to conflate Catholic wisdom with a left-leaning secular humanitarianism. I…

For more than a century and a half, the specter of secularization has haunted the West. At the beginning of the twentieth century, Max Weber famously spoke of the “disenchantment of the world.”  He premised a “rationalization” of the world where “facts” and values” were definitively separated and where “the great enchanted garden” of religious societies was inexorably replaced by…

The Case for Catholic Education: Why Parents, Teachers, and Politicians Should Reclaim the Principles of Catholic Pedagogy. Ryan N. S. Topping. Kettering, OH: Angelico Press, 2015.
 
Ryan Topping is a fellow at the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts in Merrimack, NH. This slim book is a response to the sharp decline in Catholic primary and secondary education in North America.…

Beyond Radical Secularism: How France and the Christian West Should Respond to the Islamic Challenge. Pierre Manent. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press, 2016.
 
I have sometimes deplored the liberties that C. K. Scott Moncrieff took in translating Marcel Proust’s sub-titles from À la recherche du temps perdu: how could À l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs (In the shadow of…

It feels a little strange to raise the question of Leo Strauss’s relationship to Catholicism when his relationship to Judaism has scarcely been clarified. If we could sort out the latter then perhaps the former would fall into place. Instead we are left only with questions and it is into this fog of uncertainty that Jim Stoner has cast a…