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1. Voegelin presented himself as someone who knew his business and based on a solid conviction that Greek philosophy is the foundation of political science: the lecture materials were presented from this coherent starting point.
2. Devotion to truth as a desire to communicate it to students illumined every lecture and discussion, with the exploration of questions constantly reflecting the tension…


Professor Ellis Sandoz, the Hermann Moyse, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Louisiana State University and Director of the Eric Voegelin Institute for American Renaissance Studies, was born in 1931, a descendent of Swiss immigrants who came to Louisiana in 1829. He attended and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1951 and a Master of Arts degree in…

In my previous essay about Eric Voegelin, I wrote how Voegelin became a model of thinking devoid of ideological rant in the student’s quest for the true, the beautiful, and the good. One of those students was Ellis Sandoz, who in turn became a master teacher himself in the mold of Eric Voegelin. In his chapter on Ellis Sandoz in…

Give Me Liberty: Studies in Constitutionalism and Philosophy. Ellis Sandoz. St. Augustine’s Press, 2013.
 
Ellis Sandoz’s Give Me Liberty: Studies in Constitutionalism and Philosophy is a collection of nine essays: four about American history and politics, four about the philosophy of Eric Voegelin, and a concluding essay about liberty. Two of the essays have been previously published elsewhere – one about…

Give Me Liberty: Studies in Constitutionalism and Philosophy. Ellis Sandoz. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine Press, 2013.[1]
 
“And I too am a painter.”[2] Montesquieu invokes these apocryphal words of Correggio to remind the reader that though many have written on the topic of the “spirit of the laws,” his own contribution is not without “genius.” Maybe, just maybe, it might make…

At first glance, Eric Voegelin’s contribution to the discipline of Political Science appears negligible when compared to other European émigré scholars of the same period, such as Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Hans Morgenthau, and Leo Strauss. Over time the works of these thinkers have become mainstreamed in American Political Science with their legacies preserved by their students who…


Ellis Sandoz and the Foundations of American Liberty
To a considerable extent, Voegelin was led to prefer such words as “reality” and “divine reality” to more popular ones like “truth” and “God” because the latter were so abused that they had lost their original meanings in the world Voegelin lived. In his Autographical Reflections, Voegelin took a whole chapter to discuss…

The Constitution of the United States, in its Article VI “Supremacy Clause,” announces it­self and laws made pursuant thereto to be the “supreme Law of the Land” in the United States, “and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.” This is the root meaning…