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  • Wisdom Through Suffering (Review)

    March 27, 2015, Comments Off

    Review of Michael D. O’Brien, Theophilos (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2010), 445pp. Paperback, $17.95; Island of the World (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2010), 839 pp. Paperback, $24.95; Voyage to Alpha Centauri (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2013), 700pp. Hardcover, $29.95   Wisdom Through Suffering In the first two…

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  • From Apocalypse to Love (Review)

    March 18, 2015, Comments Off

    Review of Michael D. O’Brien, Father Elijah: An Apocalypse (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1997), 597pp. Paperback, $19.95; Sophia House (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2005), 488 pp. Hardcover, $24.95; A Cry of Stone (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2003), 849 pp. Paperback, $24.95.   The End Times In previous…

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  • Camus and Modernity (Review)

    March 13, 2015, Comments Off

    Ronald D. Srigley, Albert Camus’ Critique of Modernity, Columbia, University of Missouri Press, 2011, p. 189. Hardcover, $60.00.   Albert Camus enjoyed making work plans, and filing his thoughts and writings under headings. He thereby built a structure with the Absurd as the first pillar. This major…

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  • CELEBRATION FOR G. ELLIS SANDOZ, JR.

    March 10, 2015, Comments Off

    Order and Liberty: A Conference in Honor of Ellis Sandoz   Friday and Saturday, May 1-2, 2015 Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, Louisiana What Is Political Theory and Why Should We Care? Lecture: David Walsh, Professor of Politics, Catholic University 3pm, Friday, May 1 Eric Voegelin,…

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  • A Leo Strauss for Our Time: From NeoCon Hawk to International Lawyer (Review)

    March 2, 2015, Comments Off

    Robert Howse, Leo Strauss: Man of Peace. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. xi + 188 pp. Paper, $29.99.   Robert Howse, the Lloyd C. Nelson Professor of International Law at NYU, has set out to vindicate Leo Strauss from his calumniators on the Left, in large…

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  • Tedium and His Big Brother

    February 25, 2015, Comments Off

    Notwithstanding Valentine’s, there’s not much to be said for February other than that it’s short. February is boring. Boring.   So, let’s talk about boredom.   That boredom is a pain-in-the-behind to its victims, is patent. And there is so much of it! Staff-meetings. Waiting for elevators,…

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  • Recovering Lincoln’s Ancient Faith (Review)

    February 21, 2015, Comments Off

    Review of Joseph R. Fornieri, Abraham Lincoln, Philosopher Statesman (Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 2014), pp. 248. Cloth, $34.50.   When Abraham Lincoln died the Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton, is reported to have said, “Now he belongs to the ages.” And indeed he does, but the difficulty…

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  • James Rhodes, Teacher and Scholar

    February 15, 2015, Comments Off

    James Rhodes was a man of unfailing humor and boundless affection for others, especially his students, to whom he shared, over the years, his wonderment and respect for things that truly mattered, but were difficult to face or speak about. I was his Marquette colleague for almost…

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Review of Michael D. O’Brien, Theophilos (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2010), 445pp. Paperback, $17.95; Island of the World (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2010), 839 pp. Paperback, $24.95; Voyage to Alpha Centauri (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2013), 700pp. Hardcover, $29.95
 
Wisdom Through Suffering
In the first two parts of this three-part review essay I discussed novels by Michael O’Brien that, despite their differences,…

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Review of Michael D. O’Brien, Father Elijah: An Apocalypse (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1997), 597pp. Paperback, $19.95; Sophia House (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2005), 488 pp. Hardcover, $24.95; A Cry of Stone (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2003), 849 pp. Paperback, $24.95.
 
The End Times
In previous reviews (“Everyman in Quest of His Wholeness”, Voegelinview, November 25, 2012), I discussed Michael O’Brien’s novel…

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Ronald D. Srigley, Albert Camus’ Critique of Modernity, Columbia, University of Missouri Press, 2011, p. 189. Hardcover, $60.00.
 
Albert Camus enjoyed making work plans, and filing his thoughts and writings under headings. He thereby built a structure with the Absurd as the first pillar. This major title included: an essay, The Myth of Sisyphus; a novel, The Stranger; and two plays,…

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Order and Liberty:
A Conference in Honor of Ellis Sandoz


 

Friday and Saturday, May 1-2, 2015 Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, Louisiana


What Is Political Theory and Why Should We Care?


Lecture: David Walsh, Professor of Politics, Catholic University


3pm, Friday, May 1


Eric Voegelin, or Voegelin in the 21st Century


Panel Discussion


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Robert Howse, Leo Strauss: Man of Peace. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. xi + 188 pp. Paper, $29.99.
 
Robert Howse, the Lloyd C. Nelson Professor of International Law at NYU, has set out to vindicate Leo Strauss from his calumniators on the Left, in large measure by purporting to rescue him from those who call themselves or are called Straussians,…

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Notwithstanding Valentine’s, there’s not much to be said for February other than that it’s short. February is boring. Boring.
 
So, let’s talk about boredom.
 
That boredom is a pain-in-the-behind to its victims, is patent. And there is so much of it! Staff-meetings. Waiting for elevators, waiting in traffic, waitingwaitingwaiting. Paperwork. More paperwork.
 
And it is a problem to those not themselves bored but…

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Review of Joseph R. Fornieri, Abraham Lincoln, Philosopher Statesman (Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 2014), pp. 248. Cloth, $34.50.
 
When Abraham Lincoln died the Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton, is reported to have said, “Now he belongs to the ages.” And indeed he does, but the difficulty is that throughout the ages there have been numerous attempts to use and abuse Lincoln…

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James Rhodes was a man of unfailing humor and boundless affection for others, especially his students, to whom he shared, over the years, his wonderment and respect for things that truly mattered, but were difficult to face or speak about. I was his Marquette colleague for almost 30 years, and as he did routinely for his students he helped me…

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And only imagination could speak truth of our common experience.


Robert Penn Warren,


Brother to Dragons


 


“The story is the hand, and you’re the mitt. Stories change you like mitts. You have to understand that stories are living beings.”


 Mikhail Shishkin


Maidenhair


 
Introduction
On first reading, Maidenhair stymies the reader, but in a…

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