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  • 2019 Eric Voegelin Society's Submission Reminder!

    December 10, 2018

    The deadline for submissions for the 2019 Eric Voegelin Society on August 29-September 1 in Washington D.C. is due January 15, 2019. Please submit your paper proposal and volunteer as a chair and discussant through the American Political Science Association submission system. The submission system is available here. More…

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  • Our List of Christmas Holiday Readings and Books of the Year for 2018

    December 10, 2018

    Brought to you by the friends of and contributors to VoegelinView!   Michael Henry (St. John’s University) Michael Walsh’s The Fiery Angel: Art, Culture, Sex, Politics, and the Struggle for the Soul of the West Walsh her continues his effort to restore an appreciation for Western Civilization and counter…

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  • The Idol of Our Age: How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity

    December 9, 2018

    The Idol of Our Age: How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity. Daniel J. Mahoney. New York: Encounter Books, 2018.   Machiavelli accuses Christians of un-civic softness. His attention distracted by Heaven, the Christian neglects reality on earth. Since material reality turns out to be the only kind Machiavelli…

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  • St. Augustine: The Limits of Moral Action and Politics

    December 8, 2018

    People hope and pray that their nation will enjoy peace, security, and at least a modicum of neighborly flourishing. They are willing to suffer and bear large amounts of corruption and injustice in the body politic until a time comes when measures are required to save the polity, and…

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  • Augustine: A Saint for Eternity

    December 6, 2018

    When the Visigoths sacked Rome in 410, the city that had taken the world captive had fallen into captivity. The event was a transformative moment in Western history. It marked the final eclipse of antiquity and the beginning of late antiquity. Rome’s sacking also shattered the emergent idea of imperium…

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Eric Voegelin’s Search for Order in History. Stephen A. McKnight.  Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1978.
 
In the spring of 1953, Time magazine published a long review-essay entitled “Journalism and Joachim’s Children.” The book reviewed was The New Science of Politics, written by an Austrian émigré scholar named Eric Voegelin. Voegelin, the essay claimed, had made a significant breakthrough in…

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A Good Look at Evil. Abigail L. Rosenthal,Eugene: Wipf and Stock, 2016.
 
Abigail Rosenthal is a professor (emerita) of philosophy, which is not the same thing as being a real philosopher. Indeed, there are few enough books written today by genuine philosophers. This is one. Like Socrates, she also conducts conversations with the many non-philosophers, but unlike him, she does so…

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Thanks to Sara MacDonald for organizing this past week's symposium, "On Human Freedom and Religion," in VoegelinView!
The features of the symposium are below for your readings!
Gary Throne's "Augustine: Memory as Sacrament"
Barry Craig's "Freedom in the Novels of David Adams Richard"
Paulette Kidder's review of Sara MacDonald's and Barry Craig's book, "Fate and Freedom in the Novels of David Adams Richards"
Sara MacDonald's…

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Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, written around 1592, is about as canonical as canonical gets. The play’s position in literary history (at the dawn of the Renaissance drama's golden age), along with its poetic inventiveness, and its thematic engagement with lofty ideas such as predestination, metaphysics, and morality have made it a fixture of college syllabi and a site of perennial…

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Mary Cyr. David Adams Richards. Toronto: Double Day Canada, 2018.  
 
In the Confessions, Augustine writes that his heart is restless until it rests in God (14). In a book that describes Augustine’s many failures, particularly his failure to sufficiently love others, this phrase explicitly explains Augustine’s incapacity to find peace until he is moved to have faith in God, the…

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As a popular genre, the western makes myths for politics in America and beyond. These symbolic stories of characters and communities help shape and explain our government, our society, and ourselves. They tell who and where we are, as individuals and as peoples. They also show what time it is for responding to our situations, and why. Thus western icons…

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Cowboy Politics: Myths and Discourses in Popular Westerns form The Virginian to Unforgiven and Deadwood. John S. Nelson.  Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2018.
 
What do Westerns - books, films, serial television – teach us about the emerging political order in America? What can political theory add to more popular critical encounters with this material, and what can the material illuminate about…

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La Nouvelle Héloïse is the most influential novel ever written. It shares with the Social Contract the honor of inspiring the French Revolution and, to a lesser extent, German idealism, but it stands alone as the fountainhead of romanticism. It is a celebration and critical examination of love and family. Rousseau’s romanticism seems to pile contradiction upon contradiction. It complicates…

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I like slim volumes of pith and punch. Mark Kremer’s little study, Romanticism and Civilization:  Love, Marriage, and Family in Rousseau’s Julie, is both. Its bold thesis can be similarly stated: Jean-Jacques Rousseau diagnosed the problems of modern thought and society, and, above all, their subjects, modern men and women, better than anyone. And even if he didn’t quite get…

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Why and How Political Films Matter[1]
Do films serve purposes besides entertainment?  Stephenson and Debrix point out that “Film brings us face to face with reality, or with something that looks like reality” (1973).  Jumping off from that thought, Walter Lipman famously said that “the job of the journalist is to portray a picture of reality on which the citizen can…

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