Home

  • Review of Mad Men: The Death and Redemption of American Democracy

    April 23, 2018

    Mad Men:  The Death and Redemption of American Democracy. Sara MacDonald and Andrew Moore. Lexington Books, 2016.   It’s been a decade since Mad Men premiered on television, with its alluring and disturbing portrait of America in the 1960s.  This prestige drama and its mysterious protagonist, Don Draper, captured…

    Read More

  • Justice as Friendship: A Theory of Law

    April 22, 2018

    Justice as Friendship: A Theory of Law. Seow Hon Tan. Farnham, UK: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2015.   The field of study delineated by the theory of law is among the most relevant of philosophic disciplines given the proliferation of both legislative judicial review and quasi-judicial administrative tribunals, but is…

    Read More

  • Sojourns in the Western Twilight: Essays in Honor of Tom Darby

    April 21, 2018

    Sojourns in the Western Twilight: Essays in Honor of Tom Darby. Robert C. Sibley and Janice Freamo, eds.  Eastern Townships, Québec: Fermentation Press, 2016.   Sojourns in the Western Twilight: Essays in Honor of Tom Darby is, as co-editors Robert C. Sibley and Janice Freamo state in the Introduction,…

    Read More

  • Thinking About the Politics of Multiculturalism

    April 20, 2018

    Citizen and Multiculturalism in Western Liberal Democracies. David Edward Tabachnick and Leah Bradshaw, eds.,  Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2017.   Multiculturalism is among the ambivalences of our time. The word refers to the fact of ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity in political communities. In this sense, it is a…

    Read More

  • Fate and Freedom in the Novels of David Adams Richards

    April 19, 2018

    Fate and Freedom in the Novels of David Adams Richards. Sara MacDonald and Barry Craig.  Lexington Books, 2017.   David Adams Richards is a Canadian novelist and member of the Canadian Senate (nominated by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and appointed in 2017).  Born in 1950 in Newcastle, New Brunswick,…

    Read More

  • Rediscovering the Center: A Meditation

    April 18, 2018

    I finished my last article in this very VoegelinView claiming that only with a conscious acceptance and participation in the real, mankind (especially the Western part of it), could return to a state of spiritual healthy. With the wisdom of hindsight, I now wish to continue that enquiry. The…

    Read More

  • Browning's Monstrous Duke: The Metaxy, Quantum Mechanics and the Process to Destruction of the Phaulos in My Last Duchess

    April 17, 2018

    In his poem My Last Duchess, first published in 1842, Robert Browning creates one of the rarest types of character in literature: the phaulos. Understood in the sense of being the opposite of the spoudaios described by Aristotle, who is the person perceived as a moral exemplar, the phaulos…

    Read More

  • The Second Realities of Madame Bovary

    April 16, 2018

    The extraordinary pearl of the tortured genius of Gustave Flaubert—the novel, Madame Bovary—exemplifies the kind of captivating puzzle that attracts attention well beyond the world of literary criticism.  In the early twentieth century, for example, it inspired Jules de Gaultier’s philosophy of “Bovarysm,” a psychological complex distilled from the…

    Read More

The spring 2016 issue of Shakespeare Quarterly (67.1) updates the state of early modern race study in Shakespeare.  Guest editors Peter Erickson (Northwestern) and Kim F. Hall (Barnard), chairs of the 2015 Shakespeare Association of America seminar “Early Modern Race/Ethnic/Diaspora Studies,” introduce the issue with an overview of the field, its goals, and an agenda of “concerns” (5) for future…

Read More ...

Thank you, Thomas, for your kind words; and good morning to you all.
Let me begin by declaring that, unlike my fellow panelists, who are college professors, I am an independent, unaffiliated scholar.  My status entitles me to quip that, if I have nothing to say, I do not have to say it.  So I have been free to research if,…

Read More ...

Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. Peter Olsthoorn. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 2015.
 
Brutus:
I would not, Cassius, yet I love [Caesar] well.
But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honor in one eye and death i’ th’ other,
And I will look on both indifferently;…

Read More ...

Surviving the State, Remaking the Church: A Sociological Portrait of Christians in Mainland China. Li Ma and Jin Li. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications (Wipf and Stock Publishers), 2017.
 
For people whose country is known for censorship and self-censorship, writing in a foreign language is like taking refuge in a free country.
For the author of this review and those of the new…

Read More ...

To a large extent I appreciate Thomas Varacalli’s review of my book “Towards a Science of States: their Evolution and Properties”. Most important, perhaps, is that we agree about the present crisis in the political science discipline, a crises which according to Varacalli consists in a conflict between empiricists and political philosophers about the soul of the discipline. And therefore,…

Read More ...

1
The study of sources and influences suffers a bad reputation in Shakespearean scholarship, for the most part, deservedly so.  Earlier generations of scholars too much entangled themselves in the literary genetics of Shakespeare’s plays or enraptured themselves in contemplating the creative impulses of the great bard’s mind.  They too little engaged in interpreting his plays.  Nevertheless, the repudiation of misdirected…

Read More ...

Shakespeare after Theory. David Scott Kastan. New York: Routledge, 1999.
 
Theory is dead—if the title is the message of David Scott Kastan, English professor at Columbia University, distinguished critic and editor, anthologizer of contemporary criticism, and prominent proponent and practitioner of New Historicism. If so, this twenty-odd-year-old orthodoxy, which claims theory as its major achievement, is also dead, or so Kastan seems…

Read More ...

Shakespeare’s Unorthodox Biography: The Epitome of Anti-Stratfordian Scholarship. Diana Price. Santa Barbara: Praeger, 2000.
 
1: Overview
I do not care who wrote the plays conventionally attributed, in part or in whole, to William Shakespeare of Stratford and of London.  For me, the play’s the thing.  Yet I have read a few orthodox biographies; a few unorthodox biographies, including both editions (2001, 2012)…

Read More ...

This week, the Trump Administration proposed a $14-billion cut in funding to USAID and other State Department programs designed to help struggling economies around the world. In response to a similar proposal last year, Secretary of Defense James Mattis told members of Congress at a National Security Advisory council meeting, “If you don’t fund the State Department fully, then I…

Read More ...