Home

Aristotelian Pluralism and Diversity: The Conditions for Civic Education and the Common Good

Aristotelian Pluralism and Diversity: The Conditions for Civic Education and the Common Good

With the decline in social capital and the rise of the immigrant populace in the United States, there is renewed interest in civic education as a way to provide a...
Read More
A Philosophy of Prudence and the Purpose of Higher Education Today

A Philosophy of Prudence and the Purpose of Higher Education Today

In the past decade there have emerged several books that have spoken about the crisis in American higher education. However, what this crisis is and how do institutions best address...
Read More
Higher Education: A Modest Proposal for Reform

Higher Education: A Modest Proposal for Reform

The problem with reforms is that they almost always are thinly-veiled programs of revolutionary action. Sold as corrections of abuses, reforms generally aim to subvert existing institutions and replace them...
Read More
Timelessness of Proust: Reflections on In Search of Lost Time

Timelessness of Proust: Reflections on In Search of Lost Time

Timelessness of Proust: Reflections on In Search of Lost Time. Charles R. Embry and Glenn Hughes, eds. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press, 2019.   This volume offers a philosophical-spiritual...
Read More
Raising Statesmen

Raising Statesmen

In a democracy, we get the politicians we deserve. Apparently we deserve many leaders, but no statesmen. We may be happy or unhappy about the policies a politician promotes, and...
Read More

“Stay true. Be you.” “Stay true to yourself.” “Be who you are.” “Just be yourself.” “You do you.” These slogans are part of the fundamental fabric of our society. They are echoed in popular music and books. So many movies, especially children’s movies, portray heroes and heroines who dream of throwing off the shackles of societal norms and a monotonous,…

Read More ...



Liberal education is the distinctive educational tradition of the West; so, too, is liberty our distinctive political tradition. As Christopher Dawson observed, every society works to “enculturate” the next generation, and every civilized society is aided in this process by its literary inheritance.[1] Though the Western tradition is distinctive for its multiple roots, especially in classical antiquity and Biblical revelation,…

Read More ...



Someone might say—and libertarians skeptics often do—that classes in philosophy and literature are given a quite an arbitrarily inflated value by according them credit. Do away with the credit system and give degrees based on real demonstration of measurable competencies valuable in the 21st century marketplace, and you’ll find out what studying Plato’s Republic is really worth. I admit that’s a humbling…

Read More ...

I’ve gotten several emails about this article by Joanne Lipman in the Wall Street Journal. The bottom line is that the teachers who get the best results are all about really tough love. The best way to motivate students is to challenge them with realistic (and therefore tough) assessments of their shortcomings. It’s a good idea to shout at them when they’re slacking…

Read More ...

So here’s a funny article on the sheer silliness and passive-aggressive hostility of the jargon that dominates the worlds of management, consultants, marketing, and all that. That world, it seems to me, is divided between people who use that language earnestly in the belief that it is a sign of scientific precision and sophistication and those who use it ironically.
There are those…

Read More ...

One of the latest fads in the university is being “woke”: a recognition of one’s privilege and therefore the need to empathize with those groups who have been historically less fortunate. Not only in the classroom but in the dormitories, unions, and on social media, students are being taught to be “woke”: to acknowledge the institutional discrimination that exist in…

Read More ...

I first watched this film in 2009 when I was taking Russian language classes at Rhode Island College. It was, in fact, the second Sergei Bodrov film I ever watched, after the beautiful yet hammy Kóshpendiler. I also watched the bootstrap-budget crime-thriller Brat in the same class, though despite the two films featuring the same actor – the late Sergei…

Read More ...

In today’s world, when the topic of the defects of university teaching and curricula comes up, the most well-known alternative put forward is the “great books programs.” I take it for granted that we read what are rightly called “great books”—Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, the Greek tragedians, Cicero, Marcus Aurelius, the Bible, St. Augustine, some Church fathers, St. Thomas, Shakespeare, and into…

Read More ...

What Villanova should be famous for is its well-funded and brilliantly staffed ”great books” gen-ed alternative program and a real surge in “great books” humanities majors. The program really does has a Christian/Augustinian focus without in any way neglecting either classical or modern authors.
Now, according to Tocqueville, the point of higher education today is to be a countercultural corrective to…

Read More ...